An analysis of the power of persuasion in to his coy mistress by andrew marvell

My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; A hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest; An age at least to every part, And the last age should show your heart.

In the second stanza, the speaker shifts to images of swiftly passing time to impress upon his love that they in fact do not have the leisure to love at this slow rate.

Youth is the best opportunity to cross dry and monotonous Iron Gate of life with love and affection. The imagery is insincere because it travels the full, albeit completely unrealistic, gamut of time and space.

There is a relaxed tone to these lines, spiced with hyperbole and allusion. It is written in iambic tetrameter as a three part proposition to his mistress, and Marvell employs alternative poetic styles as mentioned previously to enhance each of the three arguments in the poem.

Love as described in this stanza is not conventionally sweet and sentimental but rather vaguely dangerous and threatening; beneath the surface, Marvell seems to be issuing a warning as much as an exhortation.

The poet is about suggesting that the youth is the best time of life. There is no escape from the life and the laws of time.

Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapped power.

Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew, And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires, Now let us sport us while we may, And now, like amorous birds of prey, Rather at once our time devour Than languish in his slow-chapped power.

Had we but world enough and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime. He too will perish, consumed by his own passion, nothing but a pile of ash.

Lines 21 - 32 But all of the previous means nothing because the reality is that the clock is ticking louder and louder. Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

In the second part of his argument, the imagery and tone change dramatically. What about a feminist perspective on this poem?

To His Coy Mistress Summary

They would like the poem to be banned from being taught in school, claiming that it would negatively influence their children and that it condones predatory male behaviour. They should fight to get pleasure. Another tenet of metaphysical poetry was the rumination on topics far greater and grander than easy definitions; love was popular, and so was religion, and faith, and belief, and a variety of other topics along those lines.

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With this craftily applied offering of honest and distinguishable images, it lends credence to the first part of the poem where the imagery was far more insincere and capricious. He is clearly in awe of her body and totally wants her heart but because she refuses to comply he introduces this idea of a timeless, boundless love.

An iamb is an unstressed syllable, followed by a stressed syllable. In using time most wisely, should one focus on this life or the afterlife?

Keeping regular rhyme and rhythm throughout, the poem culminates in what many think is an alchemical climax of sorts, a coming together of male and female elements, with the emphasis on a passionate fusion, strong enough to affect even the sun.

To His Coy Mistress

I would be remiss if I did not point out the snide remark he makes line 20 about he being a better lover than a younger man, which to me is just gorgeous.

As the lines progress the intensity increases, the passion starts to burn, and when the images of two birds of prey emerge, devouring time instead of the other way round the reader is surely taken beyond mere pleasures of the flesh.

As vegetable grows quickly so he wishes that his love with his coy mistress should grow and develop vaster than empires. Two hundred to adore each breast: Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.

Marvell conjures up ethereal, tantalizingly beautiful images to flatter his mistress with an insincere exaggeration of her beauty and virtue.

Then she will no longer be beautiful. They should embrace each other now, while they have the time, be together now when they are young and beautiful, and not think about the future.

Poem of the week: To His Coy Mistress

But thirty thousand to the rest. The speaker resorts to images of decay that are at once whimsical and frightening as he attempts to convince the beloved of the need to consummate their love in the present.

Life is full of struggle and bitterness. For, lady, you deserve this state, Nor would I love at lower rate. Lines 1 - 20 The argument begins with an appeal to the coy mistress based on the idea that, if time and space were limitless, they could spend their days in leisure, she by the exotic Ganges river for instance, he by the ebb and flow of the Humber.

Furthermore, they also point out that the combination of death imagery with the light-hearted view is itself indicative of metaphysical poetry, but perhaps not of carpe diem poetry, a form of poetry which entrenched itself firmly in life.A summary of a classic poem of seduction ‘To His Coy Mistress’ is one of the most famous poems of the seventeenth century, and probably the most famous poem Andrew Marvell () ever wrote.

It’s a classic seduction poem, which sees Marvell endeavouring to persuade his would-be lover, or ‘mistress’, to go to bed with him. In this week's poem, To His Coy Mistress, Andrew Marvell takes the conventional plea to new heights of imaginative wit. "Had we but world enough, and time " "Had we but world enough, and time ".

To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell: Summary and Critical Analysis If human life were not limited by space and time, the beloved’s coyness would. To His Coy Mistress Launch Audio in a New Window. By Andrew Marvell.

Had we but world enough and time, Than languish in his slow-chapped power. Andrew Marvell is surely the single most compelling embodiment of the change that came over English society and letters in the course of the 17th century.

In an era that makes a better claim. Andrew Marvell: Poems Questions and Answers. The Question and Answer section for Andrew Marvell: Poems is a great resource to ask questions, find. Analysis of To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell and Sonnet by Elizabeth B. Browning This assignment will examine two poems that were written before The two poems I will be focussing on are 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and 'Sonnet' by Elizabeth B.

Browning.

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An analysis of the power of persuasion in to his coy mistress by andrew marvell
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